Ann Kennedy Smith on Gwen Raverat

Thanks to Ann Kennedy Smith for her wonderful talk on some of the women who changed Cambridge in the late nineteenth century, which she gave at Darwin College to our Fictions of Home group. Ann has kindly given permission to share a recent article on Gwen Raverat, who lived in two of the houses which now make up Darwin College. Gwen and her husband Jacques Raverat were friends of Virginia Woolf. Gwen’s book Period Piece: A Memoir of a Cambridge Childhood was first published in 1952.

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Ann writes:

25 July 2019

Gwen Raverat’s account of growing up as a member of the extended Darwin clan in Victorian Cambridge has never been out of print since it was first published in 1952, and it has recently been reissued as a collector’s hardback by Slightly Foxed. ‘Humour, tenderness and affection are the keynotes of Period Piece,’ Hazel Woods writes in her introduction, ‘but there is a fierce and passionate undercurrent that tells you something about the artist Gwen became.’ Period Piece features punting, picnics on Grantchester Meadows and problems with corsets and bicycles, all illustrated with Raverat’s delightful drawings, often featuring the family’s put-upon dog. “My mother had the first lady’s tricycle in Cambridge. Our dog Sancho was horrified to think that anyone belonging to him would ride such an indecent thing”. It’s the perfect book to read in a garden on these sunny summer days.

I’ve been thinking about Period Piece again because tomorrow evening I’m giving a talk for Literature Cambridge [on 26 July]. My talk is part of the final evening of this year’s ‘Fictions of Home’ course, and will take place in Darwin College, which was founded as Cambridge’s first graduate college in 1964 and incorporates both of Gwen Raverat’s former riverside homes, Newnham Grange and the neighbouring Old Granary. I’ll be discussing three women who changed Cambridge: Anne Clough, Helen Gladstone and Ida Darwin. Ida’s later sister-in-law Maud was an American from Philadelphia who married George Darwin in 1884. They hired an architect and turned Newnham Grange into their family home. Their first child Gwen was born there in 1885.

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You can read the rest of the article on Ann’s blog.

Literature Cambridge